Training Sessions

A Graphical / Textual Approach with NI LabVIEW for Signal Processing/Communications
Tuesday 4 January, 15:00-17:00

Andreas Spanias, Arizona State University
Ahsan Aziz, National Instruments
Sam Shearman, National Instruments
 
Advanced Programming Techniques and Introduction to Object Oriented Programming in MATLAB
Wednesday 5 January, 13:30-16:30
Loren Shure, MathWorks
 
Real-Time DSP for Educators: A Hands-On Workshop with the C6748 DSP  
Wednesday 5 January, 16:30-20:30
Thad Welch and Michael Borrow, Boise State University
Supported by Texas Instruments
 
From MATLAB to C 
Thursday 6 January, 14:00-15:30

Houman Zarrinkoub, MathWorks
 
Communication System Design Using MATLAB, Simulink, and the USRP2 
Thursday 6 January, 15:30-17:30

Houman Zarrinkoub, MathWorks
 
Moving Beyond the DSP and Teaching 32-bit Embedded Processors Using the BeagleBoard 
Thursday 6 January, 14:00-17:30

Mark Yoder, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Supported by Texas Instruments
 
Real-Time Optimization Techniques for Desktop Applications 
Friday 7 January, 13:30-17:00

Rony Ferzli, Microsoft

 

National Instruments Training Session:
A Graphical / Textual Approach with NI LabVIEW for Signal Processing/Communications
Presenters
Andreas Spanias
Professor, School of ECEE
Arizona State University

Ahsan Aziz

National Instruments

Sam Shearman

National Instruments

Date: Tuesday 4 January, 2011
Time: 15:00 - 17:00

Description

National Instruments will offer a complementary workshop on Tuesday Jan 4, 2010, in conjunction with the IEEE Signal Processing Society 14th DSP Workshop & 6th SPE Workshop.

Attendees will learn how National Instruments LabVIEW, add-on signal processing toolkits, and associated hardware can enhance research and teaching related to signal processing and communications.

The two-part workshop will include a presentation from Arizona State University Prof. Andreas Spanias, IEEE Fellow and Director of the ASU SenSIP organization. Prof. Spanias will discuss how LabVIEW has been applied in his teaching and research efforts.

The workshop will also include a segment presented by National Instruments engineers with topics that include:

· How you can efficiently design and prototype real-time signal processing systems with LabVIEW for communications and other applications.

· How you can apply LabVIEW to engage students with intuitive understanding of signal processing concepts in signals and systems, introduction to signal processing, real-time DSP laboratories, and other courses

· How you can develop and execute your textual .m file scripts alongside intuitive graphical programming in LabVIEW for math and signal processing

· Where to find resources for learning and applying LabVIEW, including material for getting started, courseware and labs

Attendees will receive a complimentary copy of LabVIEW and associated signal processing add-on software for simulation, design, implementation, and measurement of signal processing and communications systems.

For more information, and to pre-register for the afternoon training, please contact:

Sam Shearman
National Instruments Senior Product Manager
Signal Processing and Communications Software
Sam.Shearman@ni.com

Attendance is limited to qualifying respondents and available seating.

Presenters' Biography
Andreas Spanias is Professor in the School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering  at Arizona State University (ASU). He is also the founder and director of the SenSIP industry consortium. His research interests are in the areas of adaptive signal processing, speech processing, and audio sensing. He and his student team developed the computer simulation software Java-DSP (J-DSP - ISBN 0-9724984-0-0). He is author of two text books: Audio Processing and Coding by Wiley and DSP; An Interactive Approach. He served as Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Signal Processing and as General Co-chair of IEEE ICASSP-99. He also served as the IEEE Signal Processing Vice-President for Conferences. Andreas Spanias is co-recipient of the 2002 IEEE Donald G. Fink paper prize award and was elected Fellow of the IEEE in 2003. He served as Distinguished lecturer for the IEEE Signal processing society in 2004.

Ahsan Aziz received his BS and MS in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University. He is a Sr. Engineer at National Instruments. He manages the RF and Communications Lead user program at National Instruments. His area of interest is in algorithm development, implementation and hardware architecture definition for communications and signal processing applications. Prior to joining National Instruments he spent over twelve years working for various research and advanced technology groups at Motorola and Freescale semiconductor. He started his career with Motorola Paging base stations group where he was responsible for developing baseband algorithms and DSP implementation. Since then, Ahsan worked for Motorola’s StarCore DSP core technology center, Motorola/Freescale’s VOIP group and Freescale’s Cellular R&D group. He has developed solutions based on several wireless standards. His primary involvement is in area of algorithm development and implementation. He has multiple issued and pending patents.

Sam Shearman is a Senior Product Manager for Signal Processing and Communications at National Instruments (Austin, TX). Working for the firm since 2000, he has served in roles involving product management and R&D related to signal processing, communications, and measurement. Prior to working with NI, he worked as a technical trade press editor and as a research engineer. As a trade press editor for Personal Engineering & Instrumentation News, he covered PC-based test and analysis markets. His research engineering work involved embedding microstructures in high-volume plastic coatings for non-imaging optics applications. Sam received a BS (1993) in electrical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology (Atlanta, GA).


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MathWorks Training Session I:
Advanced Programming Techniques and Introduction to Object Oriented Programming in MATLAB
Presenter
Loren Shure, Ph.D.
Principal MATLAB Developer
MathWorks

Date: Wednesday 5 January, 2011
Time: 13:30 - 16:30

Description

In the first part of this session you will gain an understanding of how different MATLAB data types are stored in memory and how you can program in MATLAB to use memory efficiently. In recent versions, MATLAB introduced several new programming concepts, including new function types. We will illustrate and explore the usage and benefits of the various function types under different conditions. You will learn how using the right function type can lead to more robust and maintainable code. Demonstrations will show you how to apply these techniques to problems that arise in typical applications.

Highlights include:

·         memory handling in MATLAB

·         various function types

In the second part, we explore the updated object oriented features introduced with R2008a.  These improvements enable easier development and maintenance of large applications and data structures. Using engineering examples, you will see how to define classes and work with objects, highlighting the benefits of this programming approach over traditional procedural techniques. Features covered include :

·         class definitions

·         properties, property attributes

·         methods, method attributes

·         inheritance.

No knowledge of function types or object-oriented programming is required.

FREE advance registration recommended - Register for this session at www.mathworks.com/dsp0105

Presenter's Biography
Loren is a principal MATLAB developer and has worked at MathWorks for more than 20 years. She has co-authored several MathWorks products in addition to adding core functionality to MATLAB. Loren currently works on the design of the MATLAB language.

She graduated from MIT with a B.Sc. in physics and has a Ph.D. in marine geophysics from the University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Loren writes about MATLAB on her blog, The Art of MATLAB.


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Real-Time DSP for Educators: A Hands-On Workshop with the C6748 DSP
  Thad Welch  
Professor and Chair, ECE Department
Boise State University University

Michael Morrow
Special Lecturer, ECE Department
Boise State University University

Date: Wednesday 5 January, 2011
Time: 16:30 - 20:30

Description

This workshop will provide a comprehensive introduction to real-time DSP with an emphasis on how to incorporate these topics into an academic course. Getting started with industry-standard hardware has always been a formidable task and few educators have the required time. Participants must bring a notebook PC (Windows XP, Vista, or 7 with administrator rights) and will leave the workshop with a fully functional real-time New Generation Development System: TMS320C6748 DSP (DSP board, software development tools, getting started kit, and RT-DSP textbook -- a $400+ value).

Workshop limited to 20 participants with priority seating provided to instructors at universities. Free advance registration recommended by emailing Cathy Wicks at c-wicks@ti.com; in your email, please indicate your position in academia and idea for use of the system in your application/course.
Dinner will be served.

Presenters' Biography
Thad Welch, Ph.D., P.E., received the B.E.E., M.S.E.E., E.E., and Ph.D. degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology, Naval Postgraduate School, Naval Postgraduate School, and the University of Colorado in 1979, 1989, 1989, and 1997, respectively. He was commissioned in the U.S. Navy in 1979 and has been assigned to three submarines and a submarine repair tender. He has deployed in the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Arctic Ocean. From 1994 – 1997 he was an Instructor and Assistant Professor teaching in the Electrical Engineering Department at the U.S. Air Force Academy, Colorado Springs, CO. During 1996 – 1997 he was recognized as the Outstanding Academy Educator for the Electrical Engineering Department. From 1997 – 2007 he was an Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, and Permanent Military Professor teaching in the Electrical Engineering Department at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD. During 2000 – 2001 he was recognized as the Outstanding Academy Educator for the Electrical Engineering Department. During 2001 – 2002 he received the Raouf outstanding engineering educator award. During 2002 – 2003 he was recognized as the Outstanding Researcher for the Electrical Engineering Department. He was an invited scholar at the University of Wyoming, fall 2004, where he was recognized as an eminent engineer and inducted into tau beta pi. In 2006 he co-authored "Real-time Digital Signal Processing, from MATLAB to C with the TMS320C6x DSK." He is currently a Professor and the Chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Boise State University, Boise, ID. His research interests include real-time digital signal processing (DSP), the implementation of DSP-based systems, communication systems analysis, IED defeat, efficient simulation of communication systems, spread-spectrum techniques, and ultra-wideband systems.


Michael G. Morrow , M.Eng.E.E., P.E., is a Lecturer in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boise State University. He previously taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the U.S. Naval Academy. He is the founder and president of Educational DSP (eDSP), LLC, developing affordable DSP education solutions. He is a member of the Technical Committee on Signal Processing Education for the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Signal Processing Society, and is a senior member of the IEEE and a member of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE).


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From MATLAB to C 
Houman Zarrinkoub
Development Manager, Signal Processing Team
MathWorks 

Date: Thursday 5 January, 2011
Time: 14:00 - 15:30

Description

In this session, we introduce how you can use MathWorks tools to design, refine and implement your algorithms in MATLAB. We will cover the following three topics:

1.      You will learn how to package your MATLAB functions as standalone applications, C or C++ libraries or software components with MATLAB Compiler.

2.      We will showcase how you can automatically generate C source code from a subset of MATLAB language called the Embedded MATLAB. The generated C source code can then be implemented on DSPs, general-purpose or target processors.

3.      You will also learn how to facilitate stream processing in MATLAB® by using System objects. System objects are a class of objects that represent time-based and data-driven algorithms and visualization tools in MATLAB for real-time signal processing, communications, and video processing applications.

This workshop is appropriate for attendees with beginner to expert MATLAB experience.

FREE advance registration recommended - Register for this session at www.mathworks.com/dsp0106

Biography
Dr. Houman Zarrinkoub joined MathWorks in 2001 as the development manager of the Signal Processing team responsible for DSP and Video and Image Processing Blocksets. He is currently a Signal Processing Product Manager, responsible for signal processing toolboxes and MATLAB-to-C workflow. Prior to joining MathWorks, he spent six years at Nortel Networks as a member of the scientific staff responsible for wireless speech coding and enhancement applications. He holds a BSEE from the McGill University and MSEE and a PhD from the Institut Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite du Quebec in Canada.



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Communication System Design Using MATLAB, Simulink, and the USRP2 
Houman Zarrinkoub
Development Manager, Signal Processing Team
MathWorks 

Date: Thursday 5 January, 2011
Time: 15:30 - 17:30

Description

In this workshop, we introduce a user-friendly software-defined radio (SDR) development workflow for prototyping, research and education in wireless communications and networks. This workflow consists of multiple SDR platforms capable of digital modulation with synchronization and full control over the physical to network layer of the radios and an interface to Simulink. Using the Universal Software Radio Peripheral 2 (USRP2) platform as the RF front end, this interface will use Simulink for software radio development and signal processing libraries.

This combination of hardware and software will enable simple design and verification of radio systems in simulation, while allowing the user to easily test the system with live, over the air transmission. The use of Simulink for radio development will provide streaming access to the USRP2 via a user-friendly workflow environment.

The tutorial will include the following topics:

1.      MATLAB and Simulink as Verification Tools:  Radio development will include impairments such as fading and transmission delay, requiring equalization and synchronization.

2.      Simulink-based Wireless Communication Experimentation using the USRP2 Platform:  Simulink blocks interfacing to the USRP2 will be added to the model developed in the first section of the tutorial.

The tutorial will include the following topics:

1.      MATLAB and Simulink as Verification Tools:  Radio development will include impairments such as fading and transmission delay, requiring equalization and synchronization.

2.      Simulink-based Wireless Communication Experimentation using the USRP2 Platform:  Simulink blocks interfacing to the USRP2 will be added to the model developed in the first section of the tutorial.

3.  Advanced Communication Systems Education and Training using Simulink and USRP2: Cognitive radio techniques including spectrum sensing and dynamic spectrum access will be introduced to the models developed in the first two sections of the tutorial. 

FREE advance registration recommended - this session at www.mathworks.com/dsp0106

Presenter's Biography
Dr. Houman Zarrinkoub joined MathWorks in 2001 as the development manager of the Signal Processing team responsible for DSP and Video and Image Processing Blocksets. He is currently a Signal Processing Product Manager, responsible for signal processing toolboxes and MATLAB-to-C workflow. Prior to joining MathWorks, he spent six years at Nortel Networks as a member of the scientific staff responsible for wireless speech coding and enhancement applications. He holds a BSEE from the McGill University and MSEE and a PhD from the Institut Nationale de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite du Quebec in Canada. .



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Moving Beyond the DSP and Teaching 32-bit Embedded Processors Using the BeagleBoard
Mark Yoder
Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Date: Thursday 6 January, 2011
Time: 14:00 - 17:30

Description

Today’s media handling embedded processors have come a long way from the limited performance of 8- or 16-bit embedded processors or the limited functionality of a dedicated DSP chip. This 3-hour, hands-on workshop presents ideas on how to use TI’s OMAP 3530-based BeagleBoard (www.BeagleBoard.org) for teaching embedded media processing using Open Source resources. The OMAP3530 processor contains both an ARM Cortex-A9 processor and a ‘C6400 DSP. The BeagleBoard is Open Source hardware that has sold over 20,000 units since its introduction less than 2 years ago and has a thriving Open Source Software community. The 3-hour workshop activities will include 1) several demonstrations of what the Beagle can do, including streaming video and synthesizing speech, 2) Discussions of what topics to include in an embedded Linux class and 3) Several hands-on exercises to get participants familiar with using the Beagle. Participants will receive a Beagleboard.

Workshop limited to 20 participants with priority seating provided to instructors at universities. Free advance registration recommended by emailing Cathy Wicks at c-wicks@ti.com; in your email, please indicate your position in academia and idea for use of the system in your application/course.

Presenter's Biography
Mark Yoder, likes teaching Digital Signal Processing (DSP). It’s an area rich with everyday examples that can be used to motivate students. He is co-author of two award-winning texts, “Signal Processing First” and “DSP First: A Multimedia Approach”, both with Jim McClellan and Ron Schafer. These texts, published by Pearson, Prentice-Hall in 1998 and 2003, have been used in about 160 schools in the USA and in 60 different countries. They have been translated into Japanese, Korean, Chinese (both simplified and traditional) and Greek. He is also a co-author for the Infinity Project, an engineering curriculum for high school students and has co-authored the text for this project, “Engineering Our Digital Future”. Dr. Yoder is a professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Rose is a small private, nationally ranked engineering college located in Terre Haute, Indiana, USA. He received the school’s Board of Trustees Outstanding Scholar Award in 2003. Prof. Yoder received the BS degree in 1980 and the Ph.D. in 1984 in Electrical Engineering from Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, USA. His research interests include investigating ways to use technology to teach engineering more effectively. He pioneered, at Rose, the use of Computer Algebra Systems (such as Maple and Mathematica) in teaching electrical engineering. He also helped pioneering the teaching of digital signal processing (DSP) early in the curriculum. Dr. Yoder served as General Co-Chair of the 2000 IEEE Digital Signal Processing in Education Workshop.


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Real Time Optimization Techniques for Desktop Applications
Rony Ferzli  
Microsoft

Date: Friday 7 January, 2011
Time: 13:30 - 17:00

Description

The real time optimization techniques for Desktop Applications workshop will focus on various code optimization to improve your algorithm efficiency to run in real time on desktops/laptops without the need of a special hardware.  Specifically the following will be discussed:

  • Profile your application: identify the part of your algorithm consuming most of the CPU power.

  • Floating Point Vs Fixed point arithmetic

  • C Code Optimization techniques such as memory alignment, in loop optimization and caching

  • Low level optimization using Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) instructions

  • Optimization for Multicore using multithreading

  • Hardware acceleration using GPU

Minimum Hardware Requirements:

  • A Windows PC with minimum specifications
    - 2 GHz CPU – Dual Core or higher
    - 2 GB Ram
    - 10 GB hard disk space

  • A USB webcam or built-in webcam

Prerequisites:

• Familiarity with x86 Architecture
• Familiarity with C++ Programming

Presenter's Biography
Rony Ferzli received the B.E. and M.E. degrees in electrical engineering from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1999 and 2002, respectively. He received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Arizona State University (ASU), Tempe, in 2007. He is currently working in the R&D Unified Communications Group at Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA, designing next generation video codecs for video conferencing products. Previously he worked at Intel, Acoustic Technologies and Picaris developing algorithms for HDTVs, Bluetooth headsets and computer vision products. He has over 30 publications and patents in research areas such as image and video processing, DSP architectures and real-time systems, neural networks, and mixed-signal design.

 
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